Recommendations For Those Consumers Considering A Personal Bankruptcy Filing

Filing personal bankruptcy is not like it used to be. It used to be reserved for low income families that just could not make payments on their lines of credit. These days, people of all income levels are filing for personal bankruptcy. Read through the advice that follows to learn if your situation requires you to take the big leap to file for bankruptcy.

If you are being faced with home foreclosure, wage garnishments or other situations that make it necessary to file for bankruptcy quickly, you may want to explore an emergency filing. Regular bankruptcy filings entail approximately 50 pages of paperwork and one to two weeks for an attorney to pull everything together. In an emergency filing, your attorney can file just the first 2 necessary pages and keep creditors from continuing foreclosure or garnishment proceedings. The rest of the work will be completed afterward.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, you do not need to lose your home, car or other items that you have loans for. If you wish to keep them, however, you must make the payments on a timely basis in order to avoid repossession. If the payments are too much to handle, your bankruptcy attorney may be able to arrange for an evaluation of your loan and negotiate a lower monthly payment. In the case of a home, you may look into a loan modification or refinance to reduce your payment amount.

Consider hiring an attorney who specializes in personal bankruptcy. Although most states allow you to file for bankruptcy without a lawyer, your case could be dismissed if you don't fill out your paperwork correctly, and you may need to file additional motions to protect your property or discharge certain debts. A bankruptcy attorney can help ensure that you get the outcome you hope for when you file.



Decide whether you want to file for Chapter 7, or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. As an individual, you may do either one. Find out as much as you can about each type of bankruptcy, so you are able to make a choice that you can live with in the future.


Don't be tempted to race toward a bankruptcy without taking time to make sure it is the right thing for you to do. Perhaps consolidating your existing debt can make it easier to manage. Bankruptcy is a long process that can be stressful. It will have a major effect on your credit as time goes on. So, consider bankruptcy only as a last resort when you have no other choice.

Be sure to consider all of your options before filing for personal bankruptcy, as there may be some you haven't considered. If you have a job that has slowed down due to the recession, such as construction, you may need to find a new job. This could help your situation until the economy picks back up.

Be safe and hire an attorney for help. There are many websites these days that claim to walk you through the process of filing bankruptcy on your own. It is cheaper than using an attorney to get you through this time, but it leaves a lot of room for error. This is not something that you want to take chances on.

If you have a credit card with your local credit union, it may be one that does not have to be given up due to bankruptcy. Check with your credit union to find out if the line of credit will continue after the bankruptcy is final. You still must be sure to include it on your application with your other debts.

Be honest with yourself; however, honesty in filing is also paramount. You must not try to hide side income or assets that you do not want the courts assessing. This will fail and leave you in a position of having a denied petition from the court. In addition, you can lose your rights to re-file on the debts you petitioned at the time.

Take it one day at a time. It can be overwhelming to find all of your financial papers, put things in order and manage your feelings at the same time. Do what why not try here can do and don't give yourself additional stress. Take it easy on yourself, even if no one else seems to.

Talk to a credit counselor before deciding to file for bankruptcy. You have to attend an approved credit counseling session anyway in order to file, and a qualified counselor can help you evaluate your options and determine whether bankruptcy is in your best interest. Ask your credit counselor any questions you may have about what type of bankruptcy to file or its effects on your credit.

Protect your wages to live on. Bankruptcy is an important way to do just that. If you owe enough money that creditors are threatening to file lawsuits against you, it's time to seek legal counsel. If a creditor sues you, they can obtain their money by garnishing your wages, taking a large chunk of change from your paychecks. This can put you in even more debt and make your situation worse. Filing bankruptcy will put a stop to any lawsuits and protect the money you need to survive. If the situation becomes dire, you can also ask for an emergency filing, so you don't have to wait a couple of weeks for the attorney to compile all the information he or she needs.

If you have many non-dischargeable debts, filling for bankruptcy may not be very beneficial or advisable. Non-dischargeable debts include student loans, taxes, child support payments, fraudulent debts, and alimony payments. Filing for bankruptcy will not dissolve any of those debts and will only make it harder for you to secure credit in the future.

Be aware that bankruptcy does not actually cover all types of debt. Debts that you owe to the government (both federal and local) will still need to be repaid. Some people try to dodge this by financing their tax bills through credit cards or loans. This does not work; you will not be able to discharge those debts via bankruptcy.

It is not uncommon for those who have endured a bankruptcy to promise to never utilize credit again. Although this may seem plausible, this actually isn't doing them any good. If you do not rebuild your credit rating, you will not be able to buy a car or a home on credit again. Start with one single credit card, and rebuild your credit once more.

check over here let bill collectors mislead you. When you discuss bankruptcy with some bill collectors, they may tell you that bankruptcy will not affect them, and you will still have to pay them. They are not being honest, all of your bills can be covered depending on the bankruptcy option that you fiel.

Always be honest in reporting all income, assets and debts when filing bankruptcy. If you hide any financial information, whether it is intentional or accidental, you run the risk of being barred from filing bankruptcy on those debts listed in your original bankruptcy petition in the future, which means you will have no relief from your financial burdens.

As you know, filing for bankruptcy is a major decision that can have a huge impact on your life. By carefully studying this article, you should now have a much better understanding of America's bankruptcy laws, and you should be able to decide whether or not filing for personal bankruptcy will benefit you and improve your particular financial situation.

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